The Witness of the Stars by: E. W Bullinger
This is He who shall come forth "King of kings and Lord of Lords" (Rev 19:16).
                                                  CANIS MAJOR (The Dog), or SIRIUS (The Prince)
                                                  The coming glorious Prince of Princes (Sirius)

This second constellation carries on the teaching, and tells of the glorious Prince who will thus subdue and reign.
In the Denderah Zodiac he is called Apes, which means the head. He is pictured as a hawk (Naz, caused to come forth, coming swiftly down). The hawk is the natural enemy of the serpent, and there it has on its head a pestle and mortar, indicating the fact that he shall crush the head of the enemy.
In the Persian planisphere it is pictured as a wolf, and is called Zeeb, which in Hebrew has the same meaning. Plutarch translates it Leader. In Arabic it means coming quickly.
Its ancient name and meaning must be obtained from the names of its stars which have come down to us. There are 64 altogether. Two are of the 1st magnitude, two of the 2nd, four of the 3rd, four of the 4th, etc. Of these a (in the head) is the brightest in the whole heavens! It is called Sirius, the Prince as in Isaiah 9:6. Sirius (our English "Sir" is derived from this word) was, by the ancients, always associated with great heat. And the hottest part of the year we still call "the dog days," though, through the variation as observed in different latitudes, and the precession of the equinoxes, its rising has long ceased to have any relation to those days. It is not, however, of its heat that its name speaks, but of the fact that it is the brightest of all the stars, as He of whom it witnesses is the "Prince of princes," "the Prince of the Kings of the earth." Though this "Dog-Star" came to have an ill-omened association, it was not so in more ancient times. In the ancient Akkadian it is called Kasista, which means the Leader and Prince of the heavenly host. While (as Mr. Robert Brown, Jr, points out) "the Sacred Books of Persia contain many praises for the star Tistrya or Tistar (Sirius), 'the chieftain of the East.'" (Euphratean Stellar Researches) The next star, b (in the left fore foot), speaks the same truth. It is named Mirzam, and means the prince or ruler. The star d (in the body) is called Wesen, the bright, the shining. The star e (in the right hind leg) is called Adhara, the glorious. Other stars, not identified, bear their witness to the same fact. Their names are--Aschere (Hebrew), who shall come; Al Shira Al Jemeniya (Arabic), the Prince or chief of the right hand! Seir (Egyptian), the Prince; Abur (Hebrew), the mighty; Al Habor (Arabic), the mighty; Muliphen (Arabic), the leader, the chief. Here there is no conflicting voice; no discord in the harmonious testimony to Him whose name is called "Wonderful, Counsellor, the Mighty God...the Prince of Peace" (Isa 9:6). The names of the stars have no meaning whatever as applied to an Egyptian Hawk, or a Greek Dog. But they are full of significance when we apply them to Him of whom Jehovah says: "Behold, I have given Him for a witness to the people, A LEADER and commander to the people." Isaiah 55:4 This is "the Prince of princes" (Dan 8:23,25) against whom, "when transgressors are come to the full, a king of fierce countenance...shall stand up," "but he shall be broken without hand," for he shall be destroyed "with the brightness of His coming" (2 Thess 2:8).