The Witness of the Stars by: E. W Bullinger
                                                      Pegasus (the Winged Horse)

Not only shall they be received, but they shall be brought near. They will not have to be fetched, but they will be caused to come to those for whom they are procured, and will yet be brought by Him who has procured them.

In the Denderah Zodiac there are two characters immediately below the horse, Pe and ka. Peka or Pega, is in Hebrew the chief, and Sus is horse. So that the very word (Pegasus) has come down to us and has been preserved through all the languages.

The names of the stars in this constellation declare to us its meaning. There are 89 altogether; one of the 1st magnitude, two of the 2nd, three of the 3rd, nine of the 4th, etc. And, as astronomers testify, "they render Pegasus peculiarly remarkable."

The brightest a (on the neck of the horse at the junction of the wing), comes down to us with the ancient Hebrew name of Markab, which means returning from afar. The star b (in the near shoulder) is called Scheat, i.e., who goeth and returneth The star g (at the tip of the wing) bears an Arabic name--Al Genib, who carries. The star e (in the nostril) is called Enif (Arabic), the water The star h (in the near leg) is called Matar (Arabic), who causes to flow.

These names show us that we have to do with no mere horse. A winged horse is unknown to nature. It must therefore be used as a figure; and it can be a figure only of a person, even of Him who is "the Branch," as the star Enif shows, who said, "If I go away I will come again," as the star Scheat testifies.

He who procured these blessings for the redeemed by His Atonement, is quickly coming to bring them; and is soon returning to pour them forth upon a groaning creation. This is the lesson of Pegasus.