The Witness of the Stars by: E. W Bullinger
                                                                       Delphinus (the Dolphin)

This is a bright cluster of 18 stars, five of which are of the 3rd magnitude. It is easily distinguished by the four brightest, which are in the head.
It is always figured as a fish full of life, and always with the head upwards, just as the eagle is always with the head downwards. The great peculiar characteristic of the dolphin is its rising up, leaping, and springing out of the sea. When we compare this with the dying goat and falling eagle, what conclusion can we come to but that we have here the filling in of the picture, and the completion of the whole truth set forth in CAPRICORNUS? Jesus "died and rose again." Apart from His resurrection His death is without result. In His conflict with the enemy it is only His coming again in glory which is shown forth. But here, in connection with His people, with the multitudes of His redeemed, Resurrection is the great and important truth. He is "the first-fruits of them that slept"; then He, too, is here represented as a fish. He who went down into the waters of death for His people; He who could say "All thy waves and thy billows are gone over me" (Psa 42:7), He it is who rises up again from the dead, having died on account of the sins of His redeemed, and risen again on account of their justification (Rom 4:25). This is the picture here. In the Persian planisphere there seems to be a fish and a stream of water. The Egyptian has a vessel pouring out water. The ancient names connected with this constellation are Dalaph (Hebrew), pouring out of water; Dalaph (Arabic), coming quickly; Scalooin (Arabic), swift (as the flow of water); Rotaneb or Rotaneu (Syriac and Chaldee), swiftly running.
Thus, in this first chapter of the Second Book we see the great truth of Revelation set forth; and we learn how the great Blessings of Redemption were procured. This truth cannot be more eloquently or powerfully presented than in the language of Dr. Seiss (Joseph A. Seiss, The Gospel in the Stars):
This strange goat-fish, dying in its head, but living in its afterpart--falling as an eagle pierced and wounded by the arrow of death, but springing up from the dark waves with the matchless vigour and beauty of the dolphin--sinking under sin's condemnation, but rising again as sin's conqueror--developing new life out of death, and hearlding a new springtime out of December's long drear nights--was framed by no blind chance of man. The story which it tells is the old, old story on which hangs the only availing hope that ever came, or ever can come, to Adam's race. To what it signifies we are for ever shut up as the only saving faith. In that dying Seed of the woman we must see our sin-bearer and the atonement for our guilt, or die ourselves unpardoned and unsanctified. Through His death and bloodshedding we must find our life, or the true life, which alone is life, we never can have."