The Witness of the Stars by: E. W Bullinger
                                                              Draco (the Dragon cast down)


Each of the three great books concludes with this same foreshowing of Apocalyptic truth. The same great enemy is referred to in all these pictures. He is the Serpent; he is the Dragon; "the great dragon, that old serpent, called the Devil and Satan" (Rev 12:9). The Serpent represents him as the Deceiver; the Dragon, as the Destroyer.
This First Book concludes with the Dragon being cast down from heaven.
The Second Book concludes with Cetus, the Sea Monster, Leviathan, bound.
The Third Book concludes with Hydra, the Old Serpent, destroyed. Here, at the close of the First Book, we see not merely a dragon, but the Dragon cast down! That is the point of this great star-picture.

This is exactly what is foreshadowed by this constellation of Draco. Its name is from the Greek, and means trodden on, as in the Septuagint of Psalm 91:13--"The dragon shalt thou trample under feet," from the Hebrew Dahrach, to tread.
There are 80 stars in the constellation; four of the 2nd magnitude, seven of the 3rd magnitude, ten of the 4th, etc.
The brightest star a (in one of the latter coils), is named Thuban (Heb.), the subtle. Some 4,620 years ago it was the Polar Star. It is manifest, therefore, that the Greeks could not have invented this constellation, as is confessed by all modern astronomers. It is still a very important star in nautical reckonings, guiding the commerce of the seas, and thus "the god of this world" is represented as winding in his contortions round the pole of the world, as if to indicate his subtle influence in all worldly affairs. The next star, b (in the head), is called by the Hebrew name Rastaban, and means the head of the subtle (serpent). In the Arabic it is still called Al Waid, which means who is to be destroyed.
The next star, g (also in the head), is called Ethanin, i.e., the long serpent, or dragon.
The Hebrew names of other stars are Grumian, the subtle; Giansar, the punished enemy. Other (Arabic) names are Al Dib, the reptile; El Athik, the fraudful; El Asieh, the bowed down.
And thus the combined testimony of every star (without a single exception) of each constellation, and the constellations of each sign, accords with the testimony of the Word of God concerning the coming Seed of the woman, the bruising of His heel, the crushing of the serpent's head, "the sufferings of Christ, and the glory which should follow."